Why inductions in each state may be slightly different

Inductions are an essential and unavoidable part of hiring new employees and familiarizing them with a new line of work, or particular organization. An efficient and effective induction process can…

Inductions are an essential and unavoidable part of hiring new employees and familiarizing them with a new line of work, or particular organization. An efficient and effective induction process can ensure new employees are up to speed and productive as quickly and safely as possible. Conducting these inductions as Online Inductions is a way of ensuring an efficient and effective quality process. Online Inductions may significantly cut down on the time, energy and cost employees or organizations spend on face-to-face inductions. Whilst increasing the results and information retained by the employee.

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A majority of Induction processes require the same basic information when welcoming new employee’s (parts of which can be presented in an Online Induction and parts which require active interaction). Employee’s must familiarize themselves with:

  • The organization and it’s policies (employer and employee rights and the terms and conditions of employment).
  • Health & Safety regulations and possible hazard.
  • The terms and conditions of employment.
  • The location or site of work.
  • The key duties and work requirements (and how to successfully carry out these duties in a safe and competent manner)

However, not every induction is the same and there are various factors which cause them to differ. The type of work will cause differences in most inductions as the duties and requirements for many jobs are very different. Things such as organization policies or health & safety may fluctuate between States, depending on state regulations.

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How state regulations may effect inductions

As there are federal laws and regulations there are also state specific laws and regulations. State laws on health and safety may adapt minor variations and as a result, so will the inductions for organizations in each state.

In implementing the model WHS laws, states and territories are expected to make minor variations from the model, for example names of courts or tribunals, or interaction with local laws. These variations are required for the laws to operate effectively in each jurisdiction. How work health and safety regulations interact with local laws requires differences in inductions from different states so they’re suitable for local or state laws and community guidelines. It isn’t just WHS laws and regulations which differ between states.

Recruitment and induction policies are subject to change depending on state as well as any other factors which are supported by state law. Should a law pass in a state which requires any inductions conducted in that state to review a topic such as sexual harassment, that would be applicable only to that specific state or areas under it’s jurisdiction. It’s variations like these which cause slight differences in contractor inductions conducted in different states. Another considerable factor is that an organization which may have multiple sites, buildings, offices or facilities and function in more than one state is likely to have slightly different inductions for the same or similar jobs in different states.

 

 

The significance of state regulations

It’s crucial that employers take into consideration the regulations applicable to their business or organization within a state or territory when inducting an employee, both face-to-face and in an Online Induction. Not just the national standard. Construction work, for example, has a clearly distinguished National standard for inductions

“The National Standard for Construction Work [NOHSC:1016 (2005)] (the National Standard), aims to protect persons from the hazards associated with construction work. This Code of Practice provides guidance to persons working in the general and residential construction sectors on the types of induction training that may be needed to provide construction workers with an awareness and understanding of common hazards on construction sites and how they should be managed. – In those jurisdictions that have implemented the harmonised Work Health and Safety (WHS) laws, this National Code of Practice has been superseded by the model WHS Regulations and the Model Code of Practice: Construction Work.”

On top of the national standard, states may have their own specifications or regulations for aspects regarding construction inductions which must not be overlooked.

 

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This article is intended to provide general information only. It is not offered, nor should it be relied upon, as legal advice. You should consult a legal representative before taking any action or making any decision with potential legal ramifications.